Vishy Anand’s Rapid Chess Brilliance 🎇 Destroys 💥 Dreev! – Grandmaster Magazine

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London was the stage for the third leg of the 1995 Intel Grand Prix Tour and we got to see some more of Vishy Anand’s rapid chess brilliance.

Earlier wins over Joel Lautier and Ivan Sokolov gave Vishy a semi-final match against the dangerous Russian, Alexey Dreev, one of Mark Dvoretsky’s best pupils. Having beaten Ivanchuk in the previous round, Alexey was clearly in good form.

In the first round, Anand played the Black side of a Queen’s Indian Defense and gradually built a strong position. However, Dreev was able to catch him out with a few tactical tricks, leaving Anand a pawn down in an endgame. He resigned after 77 moves, meaning he had to win this game.

He opened with 1.e4, a move perfectly suited to Vishy Anand’s rapid chess style. Dreev responded with 1…e6, the French Defense. However, Anand chose the King’s Indian Attack move order with 2.d3, an early favorite of Bobby Fischer’s. When Alexey played 4…b6, Vishy surprised him with 5.e5 and 6.d4, seemingly losing a tempo compared to the standard French Defense move order. The trick was that Dreev, by playing …b6, had denied his Queen that square, Qb6 being a normal move to put pressure on d4.

With Dreev struggling to develop his pieces as he’d like, Anand steamed ahead, claiming space on first the Queenside then the Kingside. Dreev played the risky …c4, limiting both his light-squared and Anand’s dark-squared Bishop. Vishy quickly exchanged off pawns here so he could focus his attention on the Kingside.

Both players attack simultaneously, Dreev pushing a pawn to c2, trying to tempt a capture that would lead to back-rank mate. Meanwhile, Anand provoked weaknesses in Black’s King position, trading off the defender of the dark squares.

Vishy Anand’s rapid chess playing is far too quick for Alexey. In the critical position Dreev has just 42 seconds left to Anand’s 14 minutes! Time and space prove more important than material as Anand lets his Rook go to push his pawn to e6 and a well-beaten Dreev resigns.

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8 Comments

  1. What was wrong with black rook taking knight on f3? Leaving the queen hitting the white rook

  2. OK. So I need to know. Who are the two live announcers and who's reviewing the game.

  3. Damian looks like a ghost..i got terrified..

  4. Dreyev had a friend named Breyev??

  5. Damian is the most idiot looking GM. How creepy. Maybe he is dead and coaching from his slimy grave.

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